Use a in a sentence

Word suggestions (3): A, E, Usa

A

[ā, ə]

DETERMINER

ABBREVIATION

SYMBOL
physics
(a)

PREFIX

SUFFIX

PREFIX

SUFFIX

PREFIX

SUFFIX
informal

PREFIX

NOUN

ABBREVIATION

Synonyms

the, Feedback, Legal,

"A" in Example Sentences

1. You can use a colon to connect two sentences when the second sentence summarizes, sharpens, or explains the first. Both sentences should be complete, and their content should be very closely related. Note that if you use colons this way too often, it can break up the flow of your writing. So don’t get carried away with your colons!
2. Both words are articles and are extremely common in the English sentence. As such, I will go over the general rule for a and an and use each in multiple example sentences. When to Use a. The basic rule for using a in a sentence is. Use a before words, abbreviations, acronyms, or letters that begin with a consonant sound, regardless of their
3. Are two types of punctuation. Colons (:) are used in sentences to show that something is following, like a quotation, example, or list. Semicolons (;) are used to join two independent clauses, or two complete thoughts that could stand alone as complete sentences.
4. How to use word in a sentence. Example sentences with the word word. word example sentences.
5. To properly use a dash in an English sentence, start by identifying which dash you should use. Use a longer em dash to join independent clauses with words, like and, but, as, or, and for. Place em dashes around non-essential information or a list in the middle of a sentence, like you would with commas.
6. How to Use Therefore in a Sentence. "Therefore" is a conjunctive adverb that you can use as a transition word in sentences and paragraphs. It shows cause and effect between independent clauses, so it cannot be used to start a paragraph or
7. Once a little fish swam too near the surface, and the kitten grabbed it in her mouth and ate it up as quick as a wink; but Dorothy cautioned her to be careful what she ate in this valley of enchantments, and no more fishes were careless enough to swim within reach.
8. 17 Responses to “Definitely use “the” or “a”” Ronald on August 14, 2008 12:59 pm. This sound rare “I go to university.” , isn’t “I go to the university.” Jaguar on August 14, 2008 1:31 pm. Note that the choice between using ‘a’ and ‘an’ is not determined by the first letter of the following word, but rather the starting sound of the first syllable of the following
9. Exact matches only. Search in title. Search in title
10. In this grammar lesson, you will learn exactly when to use the indefinite articles "a" and "an" in an English sentence. Using these articles correctly will dramatically improve your English
11. Many people wonder whether to use a space before and after slashes in a sentence. The answer is typically no on both fronts. Spaces before slashes should be avoided. The only time it’s acceptable to use a space after a slash is when breaking up lines of a poem, song, or play.
12. We'll be late! We'll late! You'll be so tired in the morning. You'll so tired in the morning. It will be very pleasant for you. It will very pleasant for you. I'll be all right. I'll all right. To what is be pointing, in the above sentences? Are those sentences correct without be?. adding 4 sentences which doesn't contain will.
13. The most common types of dashes are the en dash (–) and the em dash (—). a good way to remember the difference between these two dashes is to visualize the en dash as the length of the letter N and the em dash as the length of the letter M. These dashes not only differ in length; they also serve different functions within a sentence.
14. When to Use Capital Letters Rule 1: To Start a Sentence. There are no exceptions to this rule. This means that, after a full stop, you always use a capital letter. If the previous sentence ends with a question mark or exclamation mark, you should also use a capital letter, ? and !, like full stops, indicate the end of a sentence.
15. Learn how to use I or me correctly in a sentence. Whether you have spoken English your whole life or are just beginning to learn the language, the age-old issue of "I vs. me" has confused students for as long as anyone can remember.
16. Em dash. The em dash is perhaps the most versatile punctuation mark. Depending on the context, the em dash can take the place of commas, parentheses, or colons⁠—in each case to slightly different effect.. Notwithstanding its versatility, the em dash is best limited to two appearances per sentence.
17. Cliche is basically a phrase or expression that has been used so often that it is no longer original or effective.There are endless ways to use cliche in a sentence:- Time heals all wounds is a cliche that people don't want to hear after a loss. S
18. When you use e.g. in a sentence both the letters 'e' and 'g' should be lowercase. Since it is an abbreviation, each letter is followed by a period. Also, when using e.g. to give examples, a comma
19. Using “An” and “A” in a sentence [duplicate] Ask Question Asked 6 years, 3 months ago. Active 6 years, 3 months ago. Viewed 41k times -1. This question already has an answer here: When should I use “a” versus “an” in front of a word beginning with the letter h? 12 answers
20. In all seriousness though, you use it to mean 'that is' or 'in other words' or 'in essence'. When you're explaining something, you use i.e. or its synonymous English phrases when you are about to express the explanation in different terms, as a means of clarity for instance.
21. I’ve seen some writers use it in their stories when they want to represent a sentence that has a playful tone (usually a character’s dialogue), such that it implies that the character is enthusiastic or happy. Can it be overused? Hell yeah. But it
22. You use "a" in a sentence when the next word begins with a consonant letter. You use the word "an" when the next word begins with a vowel (a, e, i, o, u). Asked in Example Sentences
23. Today's topic is semicolons. I get a lot of questions about semicolons, so it's time to clear up some confusion. Semicolons Separate Clauses Semicolons separate things. Most commonly, they separate two main clauses that are closely related to each other but could stand on their own as sent
24. I always have difficulty with using the words "in" and "on" in a sentence. For example, is it " he's sitting in or on a chair"? He's now in the highway? or on the highway? He's now in Staten Island? or on Staten Island? the kids are on the beach or at the beach? He's lying in bed or on the bed? He's lying on the sofa or in the sofa? He's lying on the couch or in the couch?
25. Use in a sentence. Search the hidden words in our hex blocks under the topic title and challenge to find the words with your friends.
26. We use em-dashes to add emphasis to the size of the car. It’s also important that when you set off a phrase using em-dashes that you used one em-dash immediately after the noun the phrase is describing and one immediately after the phrase. Don’t replace the second em-dash (as some tend to) with a comma or semicolon.
27. Learn words in a sentence. Nowadays, many people with poor eyesight can have their vision restored through corrective lens surgery using a laser beam.
28. "The dash is seductive," says Ernest Gowers in "The Complete Plain Words," a style, grammar, and punctuation reference guide. "It tempts the writer to use it as a punctuation-maid-of-all-work that saves him the trouble of choosing the right stop." Some have expressed support for the dash:
29. How To Use The Word 'Which' In a Sentence. ‘Which’ is a ‘wh’ word and people often think that it is only used while asking a question. But that’s not true. It is one of the most
30. Let's use the phrase for example. It is apparent that when a person desires to learn a second language, he must study and use that language outside of the formal classroom setting. If he does not use his new mode of communication, he will never truly progress to a proficient level.
31. Understanding the proper use of contractions can greatly improve your writing. Contractions can be used in any position in a sentence; however, homophone contractions such as "it's" and "they're" sound better when followed by another word or phrase. The reason is that the sounds of "its" and "it's" and "they're" and "they are" are so
32. The place that "also" takes in a sentence decides what the sentence would mean: to further explain, even if words in a sentence do not change, it is the particular place which "also" occupies in the sentence that the meaning of the sentence gets changed.
33. The Sentence Maker allows you to enter a word or phrase in the text box below and retrieve translated sentence pairs (English and Spanish) containing that word/phrase. This tool is great for seeing how words are used in a natural context. more
34. Digress In a Sentence. In speech, we use sentences that move from topic to topic. Sometimes, however, we get so far off the topic we are talking about that we have to find a way to get back to the
35. English words and Examples of Usage use "given that" in a sentence The old man's quick death was a mercy, given that it saved him from the long, suffering death that many others with the same illness have experienced.
36. a pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun in a sentence. Pronouns perform the same functions in a sentence as nouns; as the subject of a sentence or clause and the object of a verb or a
37. How to Alphabetize Names With Hyphens. Some word compounds are also always hyphenated independent of their function in a sentence as an adjective or adverb. Hyphenated Names. Hyphenated proper names also function grammatically as a hyphenated word combo would – they act as if they're one word with a singular function.
38. Sentence definition, a grammatical unit of one or more words that expresses an independent statement, question, request, command, exclamation, etc., and that typically has a subject as well as a predicate, as in John is here. or Is John here? In print or writing, a sentence typically begins with a capital letter and ends with appropriate punctuation; in speech it displays recognizable
39. In French, the prepositions en and dans both mean "in," and they both express time and location. They are not, however, interchangeable. Their usage depends on both meaning and grammar. Practice usage with a test on en vs. dans.
40. Use 'an' when the first letter of the word, abbreviation or acronym starts with a vowel sound. Use 'a' when it starts with a consonant sound. The word sound is important. Some abbreviations that start with consonants start with vowel sounds (e.g., RTA, NTU) and vice versa.
41. Contrary to popular belief, commas don't just signify pauses in a sentence. In fact, precise rules govern when to use this punctuation mark. When followed, they lay the groundwork for clear
42. Many should be written without question marks. Examples: Why don't you take a break. Would you kids knock it off. What wouldn't I do for you! Rule 4. Use a question mark when a sentence is half statement and half question. Example: You do care, don't you? Rule 5a.
43. The way we say the word will determine whether or not we use a or an. If the word begins with a vowel sound, you must use an. If it begins with a consonant sound, you must use a. For example, the word hour begins with the consonant h. But the h is silent, so the word has a vowel sound. Hence: an hour. The rule works the other way as well. Take
44. What is the rule when using 'a' or 'an' in a sentence? If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.
45. If you have used “be” in a sentence where “will” is used positively, then you simply add the negative word, “not” after “will”. You do not use “not” after the additional verb. For example, in the positive form it would be written as “I will be coming for dinner.”
46. Examples of Similes By YourDictionary a simile is a figure of speech that compares two different things in an interesting way. The object of a simile is to spark an interesting connection in a reader's or listener's mind.
47. When you use "which" in a sentence, it is part of a relative clause, directly modifying the word or words that precede it: Example: The television series, "Law & Order", which is a popular crime drama, often explains various aspects of the criminal justice system.. Notice the comma that precedes the word "which" in the example.
48. "To be, or not to be?" was Hamlet's perplexing question. The Spanish student must grapple with a similar one: "Which 'to be' to use?" There are several instances in Spanish where one English word (or tense) can be translated two different ways in Spanish (Por and Para, The Imperfect Tense and the Preterite Tense, Ser and Estar) and the decision you make can affect the meaning of the sentence.
49. a synonym is simply a word that means the same as the given word. It comes from the Greek “syn” and “onym,” which mean “together” and “name,” respectively. When speaking or writing, one of the best ways to expand your vocabulary and to avoid using the same words repeatedly is to use a thesaurus to find synonyms (similar meaning words).
50. Here is some other marerial that I found since I wrote my first reply here in this thread. Maybe it will also be helpful. Que. The relative pronoun que can mean who, that, whom, or which. As a relative pronoun, que can be used to join two sentences into one single (compound) sentence. The clause introduced by the relative pronoun que is the relative clause.

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